Surgeons amazed after removing over 2,000 gallstones from woman

Doctors were astonished after they removed more than 2,000 gallbladder stones from a woman in Mumbai.

A team of doctors led by Laparoscopic Surgeon Dr. Bimal C Shah at Bhaktivedanta Hospital in Mira Road, a suburb of Mumbai in India, removed a whopping 2,350 stones from a 50-year-old woman’s abdomen. See SWNS story SWSTONES; For more than one and a half years, the patient a resident of Mumbai had been in the know about the presence of stones in her gallbladder after a check-up with local doctors for severe pain in her abdomen in November 2016. However, she did not act on the doctor’s advice for a surgery and looked for alternate methods. But, when the pain persisted and became intolerable in the last few months, she approached Dr. Shah. “She was admitted earlier this month, and an ultrasound confirmed what was found in the earlier investigations,” said Dr. Shah. The surgery was conducted in mid-March. “Gallstones, measuring up to 10 to 12 millimeters were removed through surgery which lasted about 30 minutes,” said he.

According to SWNS, a 50-year-old woman who was suffering from abdominal pain for 18 months decided to delay surgery when doctors diagnosed her with gallstones in November of 2016. Even though her doctors advised surgery to remove the stones, the woman opted for “alternative treatments.”

But when the pain became unbearable, she visited Mumbai’s Bhaktivedanta Hospital, where doctors confirmed her previous diagnosis. “She was admitted earlier this month, and an ultrasound confirmed what was found in the earlier investigations,” the woman’s surgeon told SWNS.

A team of doctors led by Laparoscopic Surgeon Dr. Bimal C Shah at Bhaktivedanta Hospital in Mira Road, a suburb of Mumbai in India, removed a whopping 2,350 stones from a 50-year-old woman’s abdomen. See SWNS story SWSTONES; For more than one and a half years, the patient a resident of Mumbai had been in the know about the presence of stones in her gallbladder after a check-up with local doctors for severe pain in her abdomen in November 2016. However, she did not act on the doctor’s advice for a surgery and looked for alternate methods. But, when the pain persisted and became intolerable in the last few months, she approached Dr. Shah. “She was admitted earlier this month, and an ultrasound confirmed what was found in the earlier investigations,” said Dr. Shah. The surgery was conducted in mid-March. “Gallstones, measuring up to 10 to 12 millimeters were removed through surgery which lasted about 30 minutes,” said he.

Dr. Bimal C. Shah successfully removed 2,350 gallstones from the woman, “Gallstones, measuring up to 10 to 12 millimeters were removed through surgery which lasted about 30 minutes.”  ( © Goal Post Media / SWNS.com)

Dr. Bimal C. Shah successfully removed 2,350 gallstones. He said they measured up to 10-12 millimeters and the surgery lasted about 30 minutes.

“The patient is fine after the surgery and is recovering well,” the laparoscopic surgeon said.

Baby surprise: Woman mistakes 37-week pregnancy for bad Chinese food

A woman who thought she had bad Chinese food had the surprise of her life when she discovered she was actually ‒ very ‒ pregnant.

Crystal Gail Amerson thought she was suffering from food poisoning early Sunday at 4 a.m. when she awoke to stomach pains that had her running back and forth to the bathroom, according to the Pensacola News Journal.

The 29-year-old told the Journal, “I had Chinese food the night before and I kind of figured maybe I had food poisoning or something like that.” It turns out, the Pensacola woman was 37-weeks pregnant and about to give birth to her second son

“The stomach pains were just excruciating and I could hardly move,” Amerson said. “I think it was about 6:30 [a.m.] when [the ambulance] got there. … It escalated so quickly that I was having contractions and we figured out kind of what was going on because at first we really didn’t know what was going on.”

During her first pregnancy, Crystal told the Pensacola News Journal she never felt a lot of pregnancy symptoms.

“I gained a little bit of weight, but I think with my first baby I didn’t notice either,” Amerson said. “I never gained that pregnancy shape, really. And then I wear scrubs to work because I work at a retirement home for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. So I guess the way they fit me as well, it was hard to notice anything or tell anything.”

Dr. Julie DeCesare, an obstetrician-gynecologist with Sacred Heart Hospital, told the Journal it is possible for a woman to learn of her pregnancy just hours before going into labor, but not common.

“Sometimes a woman doesn’t have a normal menstrual cycle so they don’t notice when they don’t have a period,” DeCesare said. “Or they use a method of contraceptive so they think they can’t get pregnant, but then that method fails. Or some I’ve seen are just flat out in denial.”

SURPRISE BABY: WOMAN WHO THOUGHT SHE HAD KIDNEY INFECTION WAS IN LABOR

Dr. DeCesare said Amerson was a rare exception, and when it comes to warning signs, “usually by 20 weeks you can feel the baby kicking.”

Little Oliver James was born in the back of an ambulance at 6:59 a.m. on Sunday, weighing 5.27 pounds and measured 18.9 inches long.

Mother turns her placenta into a smoothie and feeds it to her family for health benefits

Jay Woodall, a mother of four, says she always wanted to do something with her placenta following the birth of her children, but never had the chance with her first two.

Jay Woodall's placenta was mixed with berries to make a smoothie. See SWNS story SWSMOOTHIE; A mum of four turned her placenta into a smoothie and fed it to her husband and their three-year-old son for the health benefits. Jay Woodall, 33, had four children, Logan, nine, Demitrius, six, River, three and storm, seven months, with husband Jon, 34. Jay always dreamed of repurposing her placenta but missed her opportunity with the first two, but found a solution by the time she had her two most recent children. She paid £30 for her raw placenta to be turned into smoothies, and everything leftover was dehydrated and turned into pills - costing a further £150. Jay said: "It's a mixed reaction, a few people think it's a bit gross - not very appetising.

“I had a boost of energy, better deeper sleep, and my mood was boosted – I felt really good,” Jay said.  (© Jay Woodall / SWNS.com)

The 33-year-old from Britain found the opportunity with her two most recent children.

Demitrius Woodall, then three, tries the placenta smoothie.  See SWNS story SWSMOOTHIE; A mum of four turned her placenta into a smoothie and fed it to her husband and their three-year-old son for the health benefits. Jay Woodall, 33, had four children, Logan, nine, Demitrius, six, River, three and storm, seven months, with husband Jon, 34. Jay always dreamed of repurposing her placenta but missed her opportunity with the first two, but found a solution by the time she had her two most recent children. She paid £30 for her raw placenta to be turned into smoothies, and everything leftover was dehydrated and turned into pills - costing a further £150. Jay said: "It's a mixed reaction, a few people think it's a bit gross - not very appetising.

A mother of four turned her placenta into a smoothie and fed it to her husband and 3-year-old son for the health benefits.  (© Jay Woodall / SWNS.com)

Jay told SWNS she paid $42 for her raw placenta to be turned into smoothies. Everything left over was dehydrated and turned into pills, she said, costing her another $210 dollars.

“It’s not really much different from eating certain meats,” she said. “A lot of animals do it, especially mammals, we’re the only ones who don’t eat the after birth.”

Jay Woodall's placenta was turned into a smoothie and then dehydrated to make pills. See SWNS story SWSMOOTHIE; A mum of four turned her placenta into a smoothie and fed it to her husband and their three-year-old son for the health benefits. Jay Woodall, 33, had four children, Logan, nine, Demitrius, six, River, three and storm, seven months, with husband Jon, 34. Jay always dreamed of repurposing her placenta but missed her opportunity with the first two, but found a solution by the time she had her two most recent children. She paid £30 for her raw placenta to be turned into smoothies, and everything leftover was dehydrated and turned into pills - costing a further £150. Jay said: "It's a mixed reaction, a few people think it's a bit gross - not very appetising.

Jay paid $42 for her raw placenta to be turned into smoothies. The leftovers were dehydrated and turned into pills, costing her another $210.  (© Jay Woodall / SWNS.com)

Jay, a self-confessed hippy from Fleet, Hampshire, also had her umbilical cord dehydrated and turned into a keepsake.

 

She said she added berries and other ingredients to the smoothie to improve its flavor.

“It just tasted like a berry smoothie, it had coconut water and berries in it, so it tasted really nice,” she added. On its own, the placenta tasted “a bit like liver, like an irony, metallic taste. It’s not horrible, it’s not a disgusting taste at all.”

Jay fed the placenta smoothie to her husband and their 3-year-old son, Demitrius. “I think everyone had it,” she said. “My husband had some just out of pure curiosity and my son tried some and said it was yummy. But again, it had berries and stuff in it,” she said.

Jay added, “When you think how much some people spend on vitamins, it sounds like a lot, but if it lasts you a whole year then it’s good value for money.”

After drinking the smoothie, Jay said she felt like “a boost of energy, better deeper sleep” and her mood was boosted.

“Milk production was good too, I had to take less because I was producing too much milk,” she added.

“The recovery after birth was quicker as well.”

KHLOE KARDASHIAN PLANS TO EAT HER PLACENTA AFTER GIVING BIRTH

The idea of consuming placenta became popular in the 1970s, but gained recent popularity with both Kourtney and Kim Kardashian encapsulating theirs after giving birth.

Many claim physical and psychosocial benefits of consuming placenta, be it raw, cooked, roasted, dehydrated, encapsulated or through smoothies and tinctures.

While many companies offer to prepare the placenta for consumption, the National Institutes of Health says there is no scientific evidence or clinical benefit to eating placenta. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says taking placenta in the form of a capsule should be avoided.

Jay concluded, “It’s one of those things that you can be skeptical about it, but in my eyes there’s nothing negative that could happen from it.”

CDC director pledges to bring opioid epidemic ‘to its knees’

The new director of the top U.S. public health agency on Thursday pledged to work to bring the nation’s opioid epidemic “to its knees” and said he believes the AIDS epidemic could be ended in three to seven years.

Dr. Robert Redfield Jr. made the comments at a staff meeting of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Redfield started the job Monday, less than a week after U.S. officials announced they were appointing him the CDC director.

The 66-year-old rose to prominence in the 1980s as a top researcher into the emerging AIDS epidemic. Health leaders widely praised his appointment, but many are wary of an administration that has been criticized for challenging widely accepted science on climate change and other topics.

Since being named CDC director, Redfield has declined media interviews.

WHO IS ROBERT REDFIELD? 3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE CDC’S NEW DIRECTOR

During the 50-minute staff meeting at the CDC Thursday, Redfield said he is a firm believer in vaccines and other public health strategies for preventing disease and stopping its spread.

He called the opioid-driven surge in drug overdose deaths “the public health crisis of our time,” and he stressed the importance of getting treatment for addicts and enhancing the CDC’s tracking of the epidemic. “We will help bring this epidemic to its knees,” he said.

He also talked about his decades working in AIDS research and treatment. “Ending the AIDS epidemic in America is possible,” he said. “I think it can be done in the next three to seven years if we put our minds to it.”

He also told personal stories. One was about how his mother raised him and his younger brother and sister after the death of his father, a government scientist, at age 32. Another was about the death of his own son from complications related to childbirth.

Redfield — who appeared with his wife, Joy — seemed to be warmly received, greeted by frequent laughter and applause.

The meeting was at a CDC auditorium, but it was also broadcast over the internet and by phone to employees who couldn’t attend. An Associated Press reporter listened in.

Redfield had been a finalist for CDC director in 2002, but the job went instead to Dr. Julie Gerberding. On Thursday, he said he was “choked up” about finally getting the opportunity to lead CDC.

“My job is to help you be able to do yours,” he said. “I want to thank each of you for agreeing to have trust in my leadership.”

He said little about some controversies that emerged when his appointment was announced last week.

He did not discuss an episode that made headlines more than two decades ago, when he was scrutinized for overstating the effectiveness of an experimental AIDS vaccine that never panned out.

And he said little about his past writings about the importance of abstinence as a strategy for avoiding AIDS over public health strategies like condoms and distribution of needles to injection-drug addicts. In the forward of the book “Christians in the Age of AIDS” by Shepherd and Anita Moreland Smith, he urged readers to “reject false prophets who preach the quick-fix strategies of condoms and free needles.”

During Thursday’s meeting, Redfield said: “I have never been an abstinence-only person. Ask my wife.”

The Atlanta-based CDC investigates disease outbreaks, researches the cause and frequency of health problems, and promotes prevention. It has nearly 12,000 employees and 10,000 contractors worldwide.

Redfield previously was a medical school professor at the University of Maryland, where he co-founded the Institute of Human Virology. He has extensive experience treating HIV patients as well as heroin addicts and has been praised for his work in Maryland on the opioid crisis.

Redfield replaced Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, a Trump administration appointee who resigned in January after about six months on the job. Fitzgerald, who had previously run Georgia’s state health department, was embroiled in unresolved financial conflicts. HHS officials ultimately said her investments were affecting her ability to be involved in issues like cancer and the opioids crisis.

Boy’s delight over new wheelchair swing at park will warm your heart

Raw video: Park in Fort Smith, Arkansas installs swing made for children in wheelchairs.

A boy in a wheelchair is filled with joy after having the chance to play for the first time on the swings at a neighborhood park.

According to a report on ABC 13, the Creekmore Park in Fort Smith, Ark. installed a swing made for kids in wheelchairs.

The 10-year old’s screams of delight have gone viral on a Facebook video shared by his mother, Trish Allen.

“So glad to have this in our community,” she wrote. “It’s been such a joy for us to see how Seth’s laughter has reached out in ways his voice cannot.”

According to reports, Seth suffers from several ailments stemming from a stroke he had as an infant.

Cancer experts say coffee is safe, despite California’s new warning label requirement

A California court judge’s ruling ordering coffee companies to put cancer warning labels on their products is not changing the minds of scientists and health professionals who say there is no credible evidence to warrant the dramatic move.

Some say that despite any well-meaning intention that may have prompted the ruling by Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle on Wednesday, it could end up unnecessarily confusing and even frightening people.

Many studies tying a chemical, acrylamide – which is formed when coffee beans are roasted – to cancer were conducted using animals who were given quantities much larger than a human would consume, J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, the deputy chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society, told Fox News.

“The substance is present in many of our foods, not just coffee,” said Lichtenfeld, who has worked in oncology for decades. “There was a minor scare about it being in French fries, and foods that are cooked in higher temperatures. Demonstrating a direct cause to cancer is very difficult. You always have to put a [suspected] risk into perspective.”

A paper cup is seen in Starbucks' Vigo Street branch in Mayfair, central London January 11, 2013.  REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO FOOD) - LM1E91B1ILX01

“I’m going to come right back and say we have other areas we need to put more attention to,” he said. “Smoking and obesity are some of those [risky] areas.”

The Council for Education and Research on Toxics, a nonprofit group, sued Starbucks and about 90 other companies, including grocery stores and retail shops, under a state law that requires warnings on a wide range of chemicals that can cause cancer. One of those chemicals is acrylamide, present in coffee.

The Metzger Law Group, which filed the suit, says on its website: “Acrylamide is an industrial carcinogen which, in recent years, has unfortunately been recognized as a substantial constituent of many foods we eat.”

“In 2002, Swedish researchers published an important study showing that potatoes and certain other foods heated at high temperatures contain very high levels of acrylamide,” it added. “The highest levels of the carcinogen were found in french fries and potato chips, but high levels of acrylamide have also been found in cereals, breads, and coffee.”

The coffee industry had claimed the chemical was present at harmless levels and should be exempt from the law because it results naturally from the cooking process necessary to make the beans flavorful.

The ruling came despite eased concerns in recent years about the possible dangers of coffee, with some studies finding health benefits.

In 2016, the International Agency for Research on Cancer — the cancer agency of the World Health Organization — moved coffee off its “possible carcinogen” list.

The substance is present in many of our foods, not just coffee. You always have to put a [suspected] risk into perspective.

– J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society

Studies indicate coffee is unlikely to cause breast, prostate or pancreatic cancer, and it seems to lower the risks for liver and uterine cancers, the agency said. Evidence is inadequate to determine its effect on dozens of other cancer types.

“Coffee is connected to cancer development by the fact that coffee is sometimes drunk by living people and only living people develop cancer,” said Robert A. Weinberg, an oncologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to The Los Angeles Times.

Kathryn M. Wilson, a cancer epidemiologist at Harvard University who has studied the impact of acrylamide on human, told the newspaper: “I think the evidence that acrylamide makes a difference for human cancer risk is pretty weak…It’s a lot more helpful to look at coffee as a food.”

She noted, for instance, that coffee is a source of antioxidants, and has been shown in credible studies to have significant benefits, such as reducing the likelihood of liver cancer and Type 2 diabetes.

Critics of the lawsuit and, now, ruling, say it feeds further into California’s penchant for regulations over what they say are trivial and even questionable issues.

Parking garages, for example, have to post that breathing air there exposes drivers to carbon monoxide and gas and diesel exhaust and that people should not linger longer than necessary. There are also warnings in elevators and airports, among other places.

“I remember noting one in a parking garage during my first visit to the state,” said writer Alexander Nazaryan in an opinion piece in the Los Angeles Times. “It was outrageously useless. What were people supposed to do, not park their cars?”

Efforts by Fox News to get a comment from Raphael Metzger, the lawyer in the coffee warning label case, were unsuccessful.

Lichtenfeld said California’s law and regulations “are frequently different than in other parts of the country.”

The state, he said, has been helpful in some cases, such as when it raised awareness nationally about the benefits of reducing auto emissions.

“But you can sometimes get so far into the weeds that you end up with a law or regulation that is well-intentioned but where the practical application in our lives is very limited,” Lichtenfeld said.

Too many health warnings can also have the unintended effect of overwhelming people and confusing them, and causing them to tune out both important and less urgent information, he added.

“It could be counterproductive, people start to pay less attention.”